How To Prevent Recalls Of Plastic Components

The complexity and size of today’s supply chain contributes to recalls, particularly in the automotive industry. As the saying

goes, the supply chain is only as good as its weakest link. Plastics have become ubiquitous in the automotive industry, as 

OEMs push the boundaries of what’s possible to meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards. In fact, as noted by

SPI: The plastics industry trade association (Washington, DC), plastics make up 50% of the volume of a car but contribute 

only 10% of the total weight.   
Jeff Jansen, Sr., Managing Engineer with the Madison Group (Madison, WI), a consulting firm for polymers and the plastics 

industry specializing in failure analysis and quality control (QC), uses a variety of analytical instrumentation to characterize 

polymers and plastics. Jansen noted that failure analysis, failure prevention and material qualification and evaluation are his

clients’ primary areas of concern. Additionally, his company provides assistance with material selection and prediction and 

process development, including how the molding operation performs.“We work predominantly with OEMs and molders in 

terms of process development,” Jansen told PlasticsToday. “I like to see a partnership between the designer, moldmaker and 

materials people. To have the material selected in concrete before you go to the molder and moldmaker is a mistake. We 

often get involved in a collaborative effort to help select a resin, and if we’re hired by the molder we have exposure to the 

OEM. If we’re hired by the OEM, we have exposure to the resin supplier and the molder.”The Madison Group works with 

several major industries, including medical and automotive. Jansen said the complexity comes with government regulations, 

and in the automotive industry the OEMs have a lot of rules in place, such as when PPAP [production part approval process]

will happen. “Between company guidelines and federal regulations there can be quite a few hurdles to approving a material 

or implementing a new material,” Jansen noted. He added that there are three major areas where the Madison Group helps 

qualify new resins: When an old resin is discontinued; when a new product is being developed; and in the case of failure 

when the company identifies that a resin isn’t right for an application.“It can be very difficult to select a new resin if the one 

in use is being discontinued,” said Jansen. “It’s time sensitive, which mandates that you need to move quickly to get a new 

resin. Qualifying a resin for a new product in development is easier because often you don’t have the time crunch.”Thermo 

Fisher Scientific (Waltham, MA) is a manufacturer of scientific instruments that include infrared and Raman spectrometers, 

rheometers, X-ray photoelectron spectrometers (XPS), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometers (EDS) and scanning electron 

microscopes (SEM). Thermo Fisher Scientific instruments are used in a wide range of industries, not just automotive,

including consumer products, high-tech electronic equipment, chemicals and pharmaceuticals.  These systems are used 

across many applications in everything from R&D, product development, analytical services and quality control.